sauvignon blanc

From Cloudy to Grey: It’s clear skies for NZ winemaker Kevin Judd

From Cloudy to Grey: It’s clear skies for NZ winemaker Kevin Judd

Post by Chuck Hayward | January 17th, 2012

JJ Buckley is proud to be the first retailer in America to sell the wines from Kevin Judd, the founding winemaker from Cloudy Bay. Named after a local soil type, Greywacke (pronounced gray-wack-y) represents Kevin’s effort to get back to the hands on, intuitive and personal approach to winemaking that had become difficult to pursue as the success of Cloudy Bay grew exponentially. Founded just three years ago, the wines have already received significant international acclaim for being some of the top produced in New Zealand.

In spite of the heaping critical praise and excellent ratings, Kevin was unable to secure an American importer…until now! Connecting with Old

Kevin Judd (c) with his dog and cellar assistant

Kevin Judd (c) with his dog Dixie and cellar assistant Fin

Bridge Cellars (known for their high-end Australian portfolio, including such wineries as d’Arenberg and John Duval Wines), Greywacke has become the first New Zealand wine in their portfolio. Thanks to our relationship with Kevin and Old Bridge, JJ Buckley has been selected to introduce his wines to the American market.

Greywacke’s portfolio resembles the wines he made at Cloudy Bay and, indeed, Kevin is working with particular blocks from the growers he came to prefer in his former job. The wines are made at Dog Point Vineyard, owned by best mates and Cloudy Bay alums, James Healy and Ivan Sutherland. During the time when he could not find an American importer, word about the quality of Kevin’s new venture washed ashore here in America, and a rare opportunity to taste a few sips of his sauvignon blanc a few years ago left me wanting more. Accordingly, I took the opportunity on a recent visit to NZ to catch up with Kevin and taste through his portfolio. It was clear to me that he has raised his game and is now well on the way to establishing one of Marlborough’s top wineries. (more…)

Regional Spotlight: Martinborough Sauvignon Blanc

Regional Spotlight: Martinborough Sauvignon Blanc

Post by Chuck Hayward | April 26th, 2010

The Martinborough region has gained worldwide acclaim for its pinot noir

Photo courtesy of winesfrommartinborough.com

but few people realize that sauvignon blanc is an important aspect of the area’s wine production. In the last vintage, 47% of the grape production in the Wairarapa region (which includes Martinborough along with the Masterton and Gladstone subregions) was pinot noir while 35% was sauvignon blanc. Yet it is Marlborough that has established itself and gained international recognition for sauvignon.

Sauvignons from Martinborough are quite distinctive and different from the prevailing Marlborough style. The palate profile is typically elegant and restrained with a long, lingering mineral presence on the finish. Flavor-wise, there are the classic lime and lemon citrus elements that are tightly wound about the mineral laden spine. Most examples are tank-fermented with a small portion (usually 10-15%) of barrel fermented juice added to the final blend for complexity. There are some notes of herbs and spices that show the grape’s varietal characteristics, but you rarely see the more pungent, herbaceous aromas that are prevalent in Marlborough.

Photo courtesy of winesfrommartinborough.com

The minerality that is so clearly evident in Martinborough sauvignons is probably a result of the soils of the region. The so-called “Martinborough Terraces” are considered the geological backbone of the area and are composed of deep layers of alluvial and gravel deposits. These soils are perfect for drainage, but also retard vegetative growth that can increase a grape’s grassy components.

There are relatively few Martinborough sauvignons in the American market despite their ability to offer a distinctively different style to what Marlborough produces. This is partially due to the fact that pinot remains Martinborough’s principal attraction. But it is also a very small region, only 3% of New Zealand’s grapes are planted there yet it only accounts for 1% of the country’s wine production to due consistently low yields. Nevertheless, brands like Ata Rangi, Palliser Estate, Craggy Range and Martinborough Vineyards are worth the search.